Baked Ripe Plantain with a Miel de Caña and Orange Drizzle

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I’m not much of a baker.  I think it’s probably for two reasons.  One, I cannot follow a recipe to save my life.  It’s a very real problem.  Even when I try to force myself, I just can’t.  Two, the changes I always want to make are healthy changes.  Sugarless quinoa and avocado cookies anyone…anyone?  So, long story short, when someone asks me to bring a dessert I usually say, “can I just bring a salad”?

Here’s the dilemma.  I LOVE sweet stuff!  I love sweet, starchy, ooey, gooey, warm and saucy desserts!  If it’s a special occasion, it’s just a bite or two of a sweet (usually chocolately) indulgence that I crave to cap off the meal perfectly.  But on a regular day I like to stick to healthy whole foods.  A baked plantain is the answer.

Biting into a ripe baked plantain is like taking a bite of warm banana custard.  It’s crispy and carmelized on the outside and sweet and silky on the inside, all the while maintaining it’s structure to have something to bite into.  And since it does that with just the help of an oven, well, it’s the ultimate whole food dessert if you ask me!  Even though I regularly enjoy a baked plantain all on it’s own, saucing it up with just a few more clean ingredients will take the decadence up a notch!

The sauce for this recipe has only four ingredients but when they come together it is a real pop of flavor.  Miel de caña is something that I’m just recently allowing myseld to keep at home.  Why?  Because it is A.M.A.Z.I.N.G.  It is the fine wine of natural sweeteners and since it reminds me of wine, well, I was just a little scared that at some point I’d end up putting it in a glass and drinking it.  But so far, no such incidents.  Miel de caña is technically molasses.  I haven’t tasted or cooked with molasses in years but I just don’t remember it being as complex and having the florally and citrusy notes that the miel de caña of Ecuador does.  At any rate, if you are looking for a substitute I’d suggest light, unsulphured molasses and as usual, please let me know how it goes.  If you are living in South America, please don’t hestitate to start incorporating this awesome indgredient in your recipes!  I’d love to hear from you and all your creative ideas for miel de caña too!

IMG_1846 (3)IMG_1865 (6)1/4 cup miel de caña (sugar cane honey) or molasses
1 cup fresh squeezed orange juice
1/2 teaspoon real vanilla
1 tablespoon chia seeds
1 ripe plantain
coconut oil or butter

Start by wisking together the first 3 ingredients in a small saucepan.  Move the saucepan to a medium flame and stir frequently as the sauce comes to a boil.  Once the sauce has reached a boil, turn the flame to low and stir frequently for 12-15 minutes.  The sauce will reduce down to about 1/2 cup.  Remove the sauce from the flame and transfer to a glass storage container.  Allow to cool.  Once the sauce has cooled down, add the chia seeds and cover with a lid.  Give the sauce a little bit of a shake and place in the refigerator to let the chia do their chia thing.  Keep the sauce in the refrigerator until ready to use.

To make the roasted plantain, first preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Then cut off each end of a ripe plantain and remove the peel.  Quarter the plantain and brush with a little bit of coconut oil or butter.  Bake the plantain on foil which has been placed directly on the oven rack.  Bake the plantain for 25 minutes or until it starts to get dark and crispy around the edges.  Serve the plantain warm with a drizzle of miel de caña sauce.

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